Historical Signs Provide Constant Access to Virginia’s Past

Dating back to 1749, Fort Harrison, also known as The Daniel Harrison House, stands tall in the Shenandoah Valley. Passed down for centuries, this solidly-built limestone house is now owned by a non-profit organization called Fort Harrison, Inc. The organization restored and continuously maintains the old frontier house and recently installed historical signs to serve as constant teaching tools across the property.

New Interpretive Trail Signage for an Old-Growth Forest

Located just south of Charleston, West Virginia, Kanawha State Forest is a 9,000+ acre forest with over 25 miles of trails and many amenities for local and national visitors, including a beautiful old-growth tract of 1,350 acres. For over 30 years, the forest has been protected and preserved by the passionate volunteers of the Kanawha State Forest Foundation (KSFF). With about 150 members, the nonprofit organization completes numerous projects each year, and in 2020 they designed and installed new interpretive trail signage.

Durable Outdoor Signs Replace Decades of Sign Pollution

The beautiful beach community of Slaughter Beach, Delaware, was experiencing the negative effects of sign pollution. Rule, regulation, directional, and instructional signs displayed along fences and on poles left a disorderly and incongruent appearance in the community. The outdoor sign pollution took away from the beach landscape and the visual clusters of signage were left unread and ignored.

Interpretive Trail Signs for South Dakota’s Mickelson Trail

Interpretive trail signs provide opportunities for trail users from near and far and of all ages and abilities to develop a connection and appreciation for the surrounding landscape. Durable signs installed throughout the trail, from trailhead to trailhead, make for a unified and memorable experience. South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks made this a top priority when working on the signage for South Dakota’s Mickelson Trail.

Fiberglass Signs Educate Cumberland Valley Rail Trail Users

The Cumberland Valley Rail Trail is a scenic, 13-mile trail that follows an abandoned railroad track from Newville, Pennsylvania, to Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. In 2012, thirteen Pannier Fiberglass Embedded panels and Traditional T exhibit bases were installed along the Cumberland Valley Rail Trail. The signage serves to educate the thousands of trail users that walk, cycle, and horseback ride along the trail each year. Signage topics share the history of the Cumberland Valley Railroad from early railroad travel, to agricultural and Civil War heritage.

Creating Connections Through Interpretive Signage

People visit parks and recreation areas for a wide variety of reasons: education, adventure, relaxation, exercise — the list goes on. The one reason that each visitor has in common is that they are searching for something they value (Bacher et al. 8). When looking at the intricate world, it is human nature to ask questions and want to make meaning of experiences. What event took place here? What year was this built? Why is this location so special? What is the origin of this flower, and what mountain range is that? Site-specific interpretation is vital to learning, understanding and finding value in an area’s past and present, while also generating future action.

Interpretive Sign Completes Fire Safe Garden Project

The Wynola Estates Fire Safe Council (WEFSC) was established with the goal of helping southern California communities become more fire resilient. This is achieved through a variety of projects and programs to preserve natural resources, wildlife, and homes in the event of a fire. Founder and native San Diegan, Coko Brown moved to Wynola Estates in 2011 and has since seen great success in her nine years developing the nonprofit organization. Recently, she has extended her efforts and developed two outreach programs.

Outdoor Museum Signage Ready For Maine’s Harsh Winters

Maine Maritime Museum, located in Bath, Maine, recently completed a redevelopment project of the front entrance and other outdoor areas on the museum’s 20-acre campus. Appropriately named “First Impressions,” the project focused on enhancing the visitor experience the second a guest steps onto campus. This was accomplished by creating new wayfinding and interpretive outdoor museum signage.

Water Runoff Management Provides Opportunity for Educational Signage

Hunt Hill Audubon Sanctuary is one of northern Wisconsin’s most diverse natural areas. At Hunt Hill, educating the public on environmental understanding and appreciation are the main missions. This is achieved through dozens of camps and classes throughout the year, but when an instructor isn’t present, Hunt Hill recognizes the importance of educational signage.