Protecting Endangered Species through Educational Signage in Camden, New Jersey

Adventure Aquarium, located minutes from Philadelphia in Camden, New Jersey, is home to more than 8,500 marine species including the largest collection of sharks on the East Coast, sea turtles and the endangered African Penguin.  In early 2018, the aquarium debuted Penguin Island, a new interactive area that gives guests a more engaging experience with the species through educational displays. Pannier was selected to manufacture the signage in a series of frameless exhibit bases including rail mounts, wall mounts and cut-to-shape Fiberglass Embedded (FE) panels.

Stopping Invasive Species with Boot Scrushers and Interpretive Panels in Minnesota

For nearly a decade, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) and Pannier have partnered together to better the recreational experience of Minnesotans and travelers alike by way of outdoor signage. Most recently, the Division of Forestry worked with Pannier to produce 14 boot scrusher stations with interpretive panels as part of the”PlayCleanGo: Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks” campaign.

Gel Coat Laminate (GCL) Panels Installed at Ponderosa Walking Park in Houston, Texas

Surrounded by lush foliage and home to abundant wildlife, the Ponderosa Walking Park is a hidden gem just to the north of bustling Houston, Texas.  With a goal to engage visitors and raise awareness for the park’s natural resources, the Ponderosa Forest Municipal Utility District and Interpretive Insights partnered with Pannier to develop durable educational and wayfinding exhibits.

Basketball Legend Honored with Outdoor Signage in Clarksville, Tennessee

As the winningest female coach in college basketball history, the late Pat Summitt has had many tributes pay homage to her remarkable career. But perhaps none are more touching than the tribute now located in her hometown of Clarksville, Tennessee.  The Pat Head Summitt Legacy Plaza at Freedom Point was dedicated to the basketball great on June 15, 2018.  As part of the Plaza’s development, Pannier manufactured Fiberglass Embedded (FE) panels and low profile exhibit bases that chronicle the life and legacy of Coach Summitt.

Preserving History through Interpretive Signage in Leesburg, Virginia

Home to beautiful landscapes and stunning architecture, Oatlands Historic House & Gardens in Leesburg, Virginia was once a thriving plantation.  Inherited by a descendant of one of Virginia’s first families in 1798, Oatlands is now one of the most prominent landmarks in the country and a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  As part of an initiative to revamp the property’s interpretation, Pannier was selected to manufacture ten Fiberglass Embedded (FE) panels paired with cantilevered exhibit bases.

Interpretive Panels Tell the History of Beaver County, Pennsylvania

When the Beaver Area Heritage Foundation set out to transform the 1897 Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad passenger station, they hoped to include an educational display of Beaver County. The idea, which was conceived in 2012, has been realized in the form of 22 Fiberglass Embedded (FE) panels and upright exhibit bases manufactured by Pannier.

The Insect World Comes Alive in Warren County, Iowa

A project that started as an idea three years ago has now become a reality worth celebrating in Warren County, Iowa! The Priscilla Gaumer Butterfly and Pollinator Exhibit at the Annett Nature Center is now home to ten Fiberglass Embedded (FE) panels fabricated by Pannier. The panels feature diverse learning tools intended to educate the public on insects, butterflies and pollinators.

A New Look for the Brush Creek Trail

On May 4th, Marshall Township Parks and Recreation had their ribbon cutting ceremony for the improvements on the Brush Creek Trail.

The 1.3 mile trail will provide residents of Cranberry Township, Marshall Township and business employees of the RIDC Industrial Park a safe place to walk. This project connects Cranberry Township (Butler County) with Marshall Township (Allegheny County). Heather Cuyler, Program Director for Marshall Township, said the improvements took five years to complete at a cost of approximately $400,000.